Skip to navigation – Site map
Varia

Virtual reconstruction of the Le Moustier 2 newborn skull.

Implications for Neandertal ontogeny
Sur la reconstitution virtuelle du crâne du nouveau-né néandertalien Le Moustier 2. Implications ontogéniques.
Philipp Gunz, Simon Neubauer, Bruno Maureille and Jean-Jacques Hublin
p. 155-172

Abstract

Here we present a virtual skull reconstruction of the Le Moustier 2 neonate based on high-resolution computed tomographic data of the delicate original fragments. In the first step, the digital fragments were assembled based on anatomical criteria. If parts were missing on one side, or were better preserved on one side than the other, we used the software Avizo to reflect them across a midsagittal symmetry plane. Missing parts of the braincase were estimated based on complete reference crania using geometric morphometrics, so as to estimate endocranial volume (EV).
When we compare our reconstruction of Le Moustier 2 to modern human neonates, we find that many morphological characteristics that separate Neandertal adults from modern human adults are already established at the time of birth. Neandertal features can already be detected in the shape of the orbit, the projection of the midface, the relative size and shape of the nose, the nasal bones, and the shape of the mandibular notch. The shape differences between Le Moustier 2 and modern human neonates in the cranial base are extremely subtle. Around the time of birth modern humans and Neandertals have very similar endocranial shapes and volumes. Our EV estimates for Le Moustier 2 range between 408–428 cc.
Our reconstruction of Le Moustier 2 shows that most facial differences between modern humans and Neandertals develop prenatally as they are already established at the time of birth. Most shape differences in the braincase between modern humans and Neandertals, however, develop after birth. Our reconstruction of Le Moustier 2 therefore supports the notion that modern humans and Neandertals reach similar adult endocranial capacity through different postnatal ontogenetic pathways.

Top of page

Full text

Introduction

1The partial skeleton of a Neandertal newborn was discovered in 1914 by Denis Peyrony during excavations at the lower rock shelter of Le Moustier in Dordogne, France (Peyrony, 1930; Maureille 2002a). The original bones of the skeleton had been lost to science for more than 80 years, until they were rediscovered in 1996 among museum collections by one of us (B.M.) and the museum staff at the Musée National de Préhistoire in Les Eyzies-de-Tayac-Sireuil (Maureille 2002b). The restored original baby bones are now on permanent exhibition at the museum. The specimen comprises almost all elements of the skull; the face and the cranial base are particularly well preserved except a part of the sphenoid corpus.

2Here we present a virtual skull reconstruction of the Le Moustier 2 neonate based on high-resolution computed tomographic (µCT) data. This paper complements our recent analysis of endocranial shape changes during postnatal ontogeny in modern humans and Neandertals (Gunz et al. 2010), which included this reconstruction of Le Moustier 2. The aims of this paper are (1) to provide a detailed account of the virtual reconstruction protocol, (2) to compare our reconstruction of Le Moustier 2 to modern human neonates and the virtual reconstruction of the Neandertal neonate from Mezmaiskaya by Marcia Ponce de León and Christoph Zollikofer (Ponce de León et al. 2008), and (3) discuss the implications of our findings for the ontogenetic differences between modern humans and Neandertals.

Material and Methods

3In November 2008 the delicate fragments of the original Le Moustier 2 specimen were scanned at the Musée National de Préhistoire in Les Eyzies-de-Tayac-Sireuil using the portable industrial µCT scanner (BIR ACTIS 225/300) of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Leipzig (MPI-EVA). The cranial fragments were scanned with an isotropic voxel-resolution of 70 µm.

4We used the software package Avizo (Visualization Sciences Group Inc.) to extract isosurfaces from the volumetric data. As with a three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle the individual fragments were then assembled in the Virtual Reality Lab of the MPI-EVA. If parts were missing on one side, or were better preserved on one side than the other, we used Avizo to reflect them across a midsagittal symmetry plane.

5Prior assumptions: Every reconstruction of missing or deformed pieces is based on prior assumptions (Gunz et al. 2009b). Below we will discuss the validity of these assumptions, and also their potential impact on the results. Our reconstruction of the Le Moustier 2 neonate is based on the following assumptions: (1) we defined a midsagittal plane and reconstructed the skull as if it was perfectly symmetric. (2) We assumed that the pattern of suture spacing was similar in Neandertal and modern human newborns. Following the virtual reconstruction of the Neandertal neonate of Mezmaiskaya Ponce de Léon and Zollikofer (Ponce de León et al. 2008) the suture spacing in our reconstructions of Le Moustier 2 is based on newborn modern human wet specimens. (3) Our computer algorithm for missing-data estimation is based on the assumption that the large-scale patterns of morphological integration among cranial parts are similar between modern humans and Neandertals. (4) Finally, we assumed that there was negligible plastic deformation in the cranial fragments, with the notable exception of the occipital fragment, the right frontal bone fragment as well as the right parietal bone (fig. 1).

Figure 1 - Virtual reconstruction of Le Moustier 2.
Figure 1 - Reconstruction virtuelle du Moustier 2.

Figure 1 - Virtual reconstruction of Le Moustier 2.Figure 1 - Reconstruction virtuelle du Moustier 2.

Mirror-imaged parts are plotted in a darker shade. Only the right frontal bone fragment and the occipital bone fragment (red) show clear signs of plastic deformation. We attempted to correct the deformation of the occipital bone by mirror-imaging the better-preserved side; this reconstructed shape is drawn in a darker shade.
Les parties reconstituées par une image-miroir sont représentées avec une nuance sombre. L’hémi-frontal droit et l’écaille occipitale (en rouge) présentent une nette déformation plastique. Nous avons essayé de corriger la déformation de l’os occipital en faisant une image-miroir de la partie la mieux conservée.

6Preservation and Plastic deformation: the skeleton of Le Moustier 2 in general, and parts of the skull in particular are exceptionally well preserved. On most cranial fragments we could not detect evidence for plastic deformation. The two notable exceptions are the occipital bone fragment, and the right frontal bone (fig. 1). It is probably not a coincidence that the two largest pieces are the ones that show signs of plastic deformation. Rather we presume that these two pieces were “flattened out” post-mortem by pressure. This is easy to demonstrate for the right frontal bone, because the left frontal is also preserved (fig. 1 and 2). The parietal bones are mostly preserved, but broken into pieces; B.M. has been able to recognize the anatomical position of most of them. However for our reconstruction we used only the largest parietal fragment from the right side. All other parietal fragments are too small to warrant a reliable placement for such a reconstruction.

Figure 2 - Virtual reconstruction of Le Moustier 2 compared to a modern human neonate (lower right).
Figure 2 - Reconstitution virtuelle du crâne du Moustier 2 comparée à celle d’un nouveau-né actuel (en bas à droite).

Figure 2 - Virtual reconstruction of Le Moustier 2 compared to a modern human neonate (lower right).Figure 2 - Reconstitution virtuelle du crâne du Moustier 2 comparée à celle d’un nouveau-né actuel (en bas à droite).

Colour coding as in Figure 1, except for the occiptal bone fragment that is drawn as a semitransparent surface. The arrows highlight the plastic deformations of the occipital and the right frontal bone. The lower right panel shows a modern human neonate in the same orientation as Le Moustier 2; the parietal bones are semi-transparent to reveal the cranial base.
Même codes couleurs que pour la figure 1, excepté pour l’écaille occipitale qui est vue en semi-transparence. Les flèches soulignent les déformations plastiques de l’écaille occipitale et l’hémi-frontal droit. Les deux figures du bas représentent un crâne de nouveau-né actuel (à droite) orienté comme celui du Moustier 2 (à gauche). Sur le premier, les pariétaux sont représentés en semi-transparence pour montrer la base du crâne.

Virtual reconstruction protocol

7In the first step of our reconstruction we used anatomical criteria (Zollikofer et al. 1998; Zollikofer 2002; Ponce de León et al. 2008; Gunz et al. 2009b; Gunz et al. 2010) to assemble the individual fragments and their respective mirror-images in Avizo. Given that the face, mandible, and cranial base are virtually complete it was possible to arrange the pieces almost perfectly.

8Manual assembly of fragments: We were permitted to CT-scan only one side of the maxilla, zygomatic, and mandible (fig. 1). However scans of both nasal bones and frontal bones were available. These bones impose geometrical constraints on the width of the cranium that make it possible to create a perfectly symmetrical reconstruction of the face. The shape of the mandible after mirror-imaging constrains the degrees of freedom for the reconstruction of the cranial base, as the biomechanical requirements of mastication essentially determine the reconstructed width of the cranial base (fig. 1 & 2).

9Correcting for the plastic deformation of the occipital bone: As mentioned, the occipital fragment appears to be affected by post-mortem deformation (fig. 1). We attempted to correct for this distortion by mirror-imaging its better-preserved left side across a local midsagittal plane. fig. 1 shows that this correction makes the occipital bone of Le Moustier 2 slightly more bulging. However, even after this simple correction, this shape is most likely flatter than it probably was originally (see Discussion for more details).

10Estimating endocranial volume: In order to estimate the endocranial volume we estimated the missing parts of the neurocranium. To this end we used the geometric morphometric protocol developed by Gunz et al. (2009) based on complete reference crania (Mitteroecker and Gunz 2009). We first generated virtual endocasts for all specimens by semi-automated segmentation of the CT images following an established protocol (Neubauer et al. 2009; Neubauer et al. 2010). After mirror-imaging we digitized three-dimensional coordinates of landmarks and semilandmarks (corresponding points on curves and surfaces; for details see (Gunz et al. 2005)) on Le Moustier 2, as well as on modern human and Neandertal reference crania. Our cross-sectional ontogenetic samples comprised crania of 58 modern humans from birth to adulthood (for details on this sample see (Neubauer et al. 2009; Neubauer et al. 2009, 2010)), as well as an ontogenetic series of 8 Neandertals (Pech de L’Azé 1 (Patte 1957; Ferembach et al. 1970), Roc de Marsal 1 (Bordes and Lafille 1962; Madre-Dupouy 1992; Tillier 1996), Engis 2 (Schmerling 1833; Fraipont 1936), Le Moustier 1 (Klaatsch 1909), Guattari 1 (Sergi and Ascenzi 1974), La Ferrassie 1 (Heim 1974), Forbes’ Quarry (Busk 1864), La Chapelle-aux-Saints 1 (Boule 1911-1913)) and 2 archaic Homo (Kabwe (Woodward 1921), Petralona (Stringer et al. 1979).

11Coordinates that could not be measured on Le Moustier 2 were estimated via a thin-plate spline (TPS) interpolation between a reference cranium and the incomplete fossil (Gunz et al. 2009b). Semilandmarks were allowed to slide on the respective curves and surfaces so as to minimize the TPS bending energy between Le Moustier 2 and the reference cranium. Missing coordinates were « fully relaxed » and thereby mapped from the reference to the Neandertal newborn based on the TPS interpolation. This process was repeated for every reference cranium, so as to create multiple reconstructions. Endocranial volumes were estimated for each reconstruction by TPS warping the endocranial surface from the reference cranium to the reconstructed configuration of landmarks and semilandmarks. The volumes of these warped surfaces were measured in Avizo.

Neandertal and modern human newborns

12Many morphological characteristics that separate Neandertal adults from modern human adults are already established at the time of birth (Maureille, 2002a, 2002b). The face is already larger and more projecting in Le Moustier 2 than in modern human neonates of comparable endocranial volume (fig. 3). The piriform aperture in the Neandertal neonate is taller and wider than in a modern human newborn and the nasal bones are longer and larger in Le Moustier 2. They have also the typical shape of the Neandertal nasal bones (Maureille, 1994). The orbital height of Le Moustier 2 is taller than in modern human neonates, and the orbital shape is already reminiscent of the characteristic adult Neandertal morphology (Boule, 1911-13; Maureille 1994; fig. 1 and 2).

Figure 3 - Le Moustier 2 (left panel) and a modern human neonate (right panel).
Figure 3 - Le Moustier 2 (à gauche) et un nouveau-né actuel (à droite).

Figure 3 - Le Moustier 2 (left panel) and a modern human neonate (right panel).Figure 3 - Le Moustier 2 (à gauche) et un nouveau-né actuel (à droite).

Mirror-imaged parts are plotted in a darker shade. The shallow sigmoid notch, as well as the rounded gonial area are typical Neandertal traits that can already be observed in this newborn specimen.
Les parties représentées par une image-miroir sont représentées avec une nuance plus sombre. La faible échancrure sigmoïde et la région goniaque arrondie, typiques des Néandertaliens adultes, peuvent déjà être observées sur ce nouveau-né fossile.

13The mandible of Le Moustier 2 exhibits the typical Neandertal shape (Rak 1986; fig. 4): the shallow mandibular (sigmoid) notch, clearly distinguish Le Moustier 2 from modern human neonates. Moreover, the gonial area of Le Mousier 2 is rounder and less angled (Rosas 2001) than in modern humans (fig. 4).

Figure 4 - Mandibles of Le Moustier 2 (left panel) and a modern human neonate (right panel).
Figure 4 - Mandibule du Moustier 2 (à gauche) et d’un nouveau-né actuel (à droite).

Figure 4 - Mandibles of Le Moustier 2 (left panel) and a modern human neonate (right panel).Figure 4 - Mandibule du Moustier 2 (à gauche) et d’un nouveau-né actuel (à droite).

Mirror-imaged parts are plotted in a darker shade. The shallow sigmoid notch, as well as the rounded gonial area are typical Neandertal traits that can already be observed in this newborn specimen.
Les parties représentées par une image-miroir sont représentées avec une nuance plus sombre. La faible échancrure sigmoïde et la région goniaque arrondie, typiques des Néandertaliens adultes, peuvent déjà être observées sur ce nouveau-né fossile.

14The shape differences between Le Moustier 2 and modern human neonates in the cranial base are extremely subtle (fig. 2 and 3; for a detailed discussion see also (Maureille 2002a)). The foramen magnum of Le Moustier 2 was probably slightly more elongated than in a modern human newborn (Rak 1986), however the exact length of the foramen magnum is difficult to determine, as the sutures are still open in neonates. Around the time of birth modern humans and Neandertals have very similar endocranial shapes and volumes: the endocranial capacities of different reconstructions of the Neandertal neonate Le Moustier 2 range between 408–428 cc.

Discussion

15The validity of the prior assumptions that underpin any reconstruction of partially preserved and distorted fossil material is pivotal for the quality of the reconstruction (Gunz et al. 2009b). In the following we will discuss the potential impact of these prior assumptions on the reconstruction of Le Moustier 2, particularly with respect to our recent finding about developmental differences between modern humans and Neandertals (Gunz et al. 2010 and fig. 5). Studying the endocranial shape changes of modern humans and Neandertals from birth to adulthood, we could show that modern human braincases undergo a “globularization-phase” in the first year of life. The shape changes during the first year of life comprise a relative expansion of the parietal bone, the occipital bone and flexion of the cranial base (Neubauer et al. 2009; Neubauer et al. 2010). This phase is absent from Neandertals, and appears to be unique to modern humans (Gunz et al. 2010; Neubauer et al. 2010).

Figure 5 - Principal component analysis of postnatal endocranial shape changes.
Figure 5 - Analyses en composantes principales des changements de forme du volume endocrânien après la naissance.

Figure 5 - Principal component analysis of postnatal endocranial shape changes.Figure 5 - Analyses en composantes principales des changements de forme du volume endocrânien après la naissance.

Endocranial shape differences between modern humans (blue) and Neanderthals (red) develop largely after birth. Between dental age groups 1 and 2 (based on dental eruption patterns (1: no teeth erupted, 2: incomplete deciduous dentition)), the endocast of modern humans changes from an elongated to a more globular shape, as the cranial base flexes and the occipital and parietal bones « bulge ». The red disks represent the reconstruction uncertainty of incomplete fossil specimens, based on multiple reconstructions of the same endocast. Note that the reconstruction distributions of Le Moustier 2 (age group 1) and Pech-de-L’Azé 1 (age group 3) overlap. Neanderthals therefore lack the « globularization phase » directly after birth.
Les différences concernant la forme du volume endocrânien entre les Hommes modernes (en bleu) et les Néandertaliens (en rouge) se mettent en place seulement après la naissance. Entre les groupes 1 et 2 (basés sur l’éruption des dents (1 : aucune dent déciduale en place, 2 : dentition déciduale partiellement en place)), l’endocrâne des sujets modernes change en passant d’une forme allongée à une forme plus globuleuse s’accompagnant d’une flexion de la base du crâne et d’un bombement des pariétaux et de l’occipital. Les cercles rouges représentent la sphère des possibles des différentes reconstitutions de l’endocrâne des spécimens fossiles incomplets. Notez que la sphère du Moustier 2 (groupe 1) et celle de Pech-de-l’Azé 1 (groupe 3) se chevauchent. Les Néandertaliens ne semblent pas présenter la phase de « globularisation » qui se met en place rapidement après la naissance chez l’Homme moderne.

Figure modified after Gunz et al. (2010).
D’après Gunz et al. (2010), modifié.

16The braincases of adult Neandertals are much more elongated than those of modern human adults (Bruner et al. 2003; Bruner 2004; Bruner and Manzi 2008; Lieberman et al. 2002; Lieberman et al. 2004; Lieberman 2008; Lieberman et al. 2008; Neubauer et al. 2009; Gunz and Harvati 2007; Grine et al. 2007; Harvati 2009). For the pattern of shape changes during development in modern humans and Neandertals to be identical (i.e. if Neandertals had a “globularization phase” like modern humans cf. Neubauer et al. 2009; Neubauer et al. 2010), the braincase of a Neandertal neonate would have to be extremely elongated (Gunz et al. 2010). The current reconstruction of Le Moustier 2 represents the most elongated shape of the braincase that is anatomically feasible.

17Prior assumptions: Firstly, we have made the assumption that the original specimen was perfectly symmetrical, and that the symmetry axis was a perfect plane. While this assumption is simplifying, as we are purposefully ignoring bilateral and fluctuating asymmetry, its impact on the Neandertal–modern human comparisons below is negligible. In our recent statistical analysis of endocranial shape changes during development (Gunz et al. 2010) we symmetrized all specimens by reflected relabeling, so as to remove the asymmetry information from all specimens, not only the reconstructed fossil skulls (for more details see the supplemental information for Gunz et al. 2010).

18Secondly, our reconstruction was based on the fact that the cranial sutures were still open in Le Moustier 2, and that the spacing of interosseous sutures can be estimated from modern human wet specimens (following Ponce de León and colleagues 2008). It is clear from the morphology of all Neandertal neonate’s bones (fig. 1), that the sutures were still wide open, and that the bones were not fully ossified at the time of death. While it is impossible to test whether the second proposition is correct, it is worth noting that a tighter spacing of the interosseous sutures than in the reconstructions shown in fig. 1, 2, 3, and 6 would result in a more globular shape of the braincase of Le Moustier 2. The same reasoning applies to the correction of the taphonomic distortion of the occipital bone. We have noted above that our “retrodeformation” via mirror-imaging most likely does not fully correct the distortion of the occipital bone. However, no additional correction of this distortion was made, so as not to bias the results of our study on Neandertal endocranial shape changes during ontogeny (Gunz et al. 2010): this « flat » reconstruction of the Le Moustier 2 occipital shape, is biased against our finding that developmental patterns of Neandertals and modern humans differ directly after birth. Tighter suture spacing, and additional corrections of the occipital-distortion would result in a more globular shape of the braincase and endocast. A more globular shape of the braincase of a Neandertal neonate than the one shown in fig. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 would imply even more pronounced developmental differences between modern humans and Neandertals than we reported in Gunz et al. (2010). Our assumptions about the suture spacing and the occipital shape are therefore conservatively biased against our previous finding.

Figure 6 - One of the reconstructions of Le Moustier 2.
Figure 6 - Une des reconstructions du Moustier 2.

Figure 6 - One of the reconstructions of Le Moustier 2.Figure 6 - Une des reconstructions du Moustier 2.

Mirror-imaged parts are plotted in a darker shade. Missing parts of the braincase were estimated using a thin-plate spline interpolation based on hundreds of landmarks and semilandmarks between a modern human neonate and Le Moustier 2.
Les parties reconstituées par une image-miroir sont représentées avec une nuance sombre. Les parties manquantes de la boîte crânienne ont été estimées par la méthode d’interpolation Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) basée sur des centaines de landmarks et semilandmarks entre un nouveau-né actuel et Le Moustier 2.

19Finally, the assumptions that underlie the thin-plate spline based estimation of the missing parts of the braincase, arguably will have the biggest impact on the reconstruction. We have shown previously that the different parts of the braincase are tightly integrated (Gunz and Harvati 2007), and that the large-scale patterns of integration are similar between modern humans and Neandertals (Bookstein et al. 2003; Gunz and Harvati 2007). All extant and fossil specimens were part of the reference sample used for the multiple reconstructions; the range of the estimated endocranial volumes for Le Moustier 2 therefore represents a conservative estimate of the reconstruction uncertainty (Gunz et al. 2009a; Gunz et al. 2009b; Grine et al. 2010).

20Our virtual reconstruction of Le Moustier 2 corroborates the results of many previous studies of Neandertal subadults (Nicholson and Harvati 2006; Weaver and Hublin 2009; Zollikofer and Ponce de León 2009; Ponce de León et al. 2008; Bastir et al. 2007; Ponce de León 2002; Maureille 2002a, 2002b; Ponce de León and Zollikofer 2001; Tillier 1996): the face of Neandertal neonates is absolutely larger than the face of modern human newborns. At this early ontogenetic stage Neandertal features can already be detected in the shape of the orbit, the projection of the midface, the relative size and shape of the nose, and the shape of the mandibular notch. Interestingly, we found only subtle shape differences between modern human neonates and Le Moustier 2 in the cranial base. Our virtual reconstructions of the braincase also consistently showed that endocranial shapes and volumes at the time of birth were very similar in modern humans and Neandertals. The braincases of Neandertal neonates were most likely only slightly more elongated than those of Homo sapiens newborns (Gunz et al. 2010).

21All aspects of our reconstruction of Le Moustier 2 are consistent with the morphology of the even more complete Neandertal neonate from Mezmaiskaya cave (Russia), as reconstructed by Ponce de León and colleagues (Ponce de León et al. 2008): the face of the Mezmaiskaya newborn is also larger and more projecting than in a modern human neonate. The nasal bones are not preserved in Mezmaiskaya 1, but the piriform aperture is as large as in Le Moustier 2. Orbital shape and mandibular morphology of Mezmaiskaya 1 show clear Neandertal characteristics, just like in Le Moustier 2. The reconstructed endocranial volumes for the Mezmaiskaya specimen range between 422–436 cc (Ponce de León et al. 2008). Endocranial volumes at the time of birth were therefore similar in modern humans and Neandertals (Zollikofer and Ponce de León 2009; Gunz et al. 2010).

22Implications for Neandertal ontogeny: Comparing the cranial reconstructions of the two most complete Neandertal neonates - Le Moustier 2 and Mezmaiskaya 1 - with modern human babies, a consistent picture emerges: Neandertal facial characteristics - including facial size - are already established around the time of birth, and therefore must develop prenatally. Neonatal endocranial volumes, however were similar between modern humans and Neandertals, and the shape of modern human and Neandertal braincases (and therefore endocasts) at the time of birth was elongated. Given that the globular shape of the neurocranium distinguishes adult Homo sapiens from all other fossil humans, including Neandertals (Ponce de León and Zollikofer 2001; Lieberman et al. 2002, 2004; Harvati 2003, 2009; Harvati et al. 2004, 2007; Bastir et al. 2006, 2008, 2010; Gunz and Harvati 2007; Grine et al. 2007; Pearson 2008; Gunz et al. 2009a), this implies that the characteristic modern human braincase shape largely develops after birth. In the first years of life the cranial bones are thin and the sutures are open; shape changes of the braincase are therefore largely driven by the rapidly expanding brain (Moss and Young 1960; Richtsmeier et al. 2006; Richtsmeier and Deleon 2009; Heuzé et al. 2010; Enlow 1968; Enlow and Hans 1996). While the growth of the face affects the shape of the cranial base (Sperber 1989; Bastir and Rosas 2006; Rosas et al. 2008; Bastir 2008; Bastir and Rosas 2009; Bastir et al. 2010; Bookstein et al. 2003; Neubauer et al. 2009; 2010), it is unlikely that this alone could explain the shape changes of the parietal and occipital bone during the modern human « globularization phase. » Maureille and Bar (1999) suggested that a facial suture could have had a slower synostosis in Neandertals. Studies of brain growth (Ponce de León et al. 2008; Zollikofer and Ponce de León 2009) suggest that aspects of Neandertal development were faster than in modern humans, as do studies on dental development (Ramirez Rozzi and Bermudez De Castro 2004; Smith et al. 2007; Smith et al. 2007; Smith et al. 2010), although overlap exists (Guatelli-Steinberg et al. 2005; Macchiarelli et al. 2006; Reid et al. 2008; Bayle et al. 2009). The “globularization-phase” therefore most likely reflects differences in the tempo and mode of brain development between modern humans and Neandertals (Gunz et al. 2010).

23Based on the comparative studies of adult endocasts Bruner and colleagues (Bruner et al. 2003; Bruner 2004; Bruner and Manzi 2008; Bruner 2010) have suggested differences in encephalization between moderns and Neandertals. Such differences between adult forms must ultimately be rooted in differences of development. It was unclear, however, when during individual development these species differences emerge. We have shown that most facial differences between modern humans and Neandertals develop prenatally as they are already established at the time of birth. Most modern human-Neandertal shape differences in the braincase and the endocast, however, develop after birth. Modern humans and Neandertals therefore reach similar adult endocranial capacity through different postnatal ontogenetic pathways.

We thank the following people for access to specimens and help with acquisition of CT data: C. Boesch, J. Braga, H. Coqueugniot, C. Feja, M. von Harling, B. Herzig, A. Le Cabec, J.L. Kahn, George D. Koufos, F. Mayer, F. Renoult, U. Schwarz, K. Spanel-Borowski, H. Temming, F. Veillon, G.W. Weber, A. Winter, A. Winzer. The scanning of the Le Moustier 2 specimen has been made possible thanks to the support of the Musée National de Préhistoire Les Eyzies de Tayac (France) and J.-J. Cleyet-Merle. This work was supported by EU FP6 Marie Curie Actions grant MRTN-CT-2005-019564 « EVAN » and by the Max Planck Society. B.M. thanks the Région Aquitaine project Transitions d’une société à l’autre: processus d’adaptation et de peuplement, research program 2005, convention 20051403003AB for financial support during the excavations of the Le Moustier 2 remains, their anatomical restoration and their still unpublished scientific description.

Top of page

Bibliography

DOI are automaticaly added to references by Bilbo, OpenEdition's Bibliographic Annotation Tool.
Users of institutions which have subscribed to one of OpenEdition freemium programs can download references for which Bilbo found a DOI in standard formats using the buttons available on the right.
Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

BASTIR M. 2008 - A systems-model for the morphological analysis of integration and modularity in human craniofacial evolution. Journal of anthropological sciences= Rivista di antropologia: JASS / Istituto italiano di antropologia, 86: 37-58.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

BASTIR M., ROSAS A. 2006 - Correlated variation between the lateral basicranium and the face: a geometric morphometric study in different human groups. Archives of Oral Biology, 51: 814-824.
DOI : 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2006.03.009

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

BASTIR M., ROSAS A., O’HIGGINS P. 2006 - Craniofacial levels and the morphological maturation of the human skull. Journal of Anatomy, 209: 637-654.
DOI : 10.1111/j.1469-7580.2006.00644.x

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

BASTIR M., O’HIGGINS P., ROSAS A. 2007 - Facial ontogeny in Neanderthals and modern humans. Proceedings of Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 274: 1125-132.
DOI : 10.1098/rspb.2006.0448

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

BASTIR M., ROSAS A., LIEBERMAN D. E., O’HIGGINS P. 2008 - Middle cranial fossa anatomy and the origin of modern humans. Anatomical Record, 291: 130-140.
DOI : 10.1002/ar.20636

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

BASTIR M., SOBRAL P. G., KUROE K., ROSAS A. 2008 - Human craniofacial sphericity: a simultaneous analysis of frontal and lateral cephalograms of a Japanese population using geometric morphometrics and partial least squares analysis. Archives of Oral Biology, 53: 295-303.
DOI : 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2007.09.011

BASTIR M., ROSAS A. 2009 - Mosaic Evolution of the Basicranium in Homo and its Relation to Modular Development. Evolutionary Biology, 36: 57-70.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

BASTIR M., ROSAS A., STRINGER C., MANUEL CUÉTARA J., KRUSZYNSKI R., WEBER G. W., ROSS C. F., RAVOSA M. J. 2010 - Effects of brain and facial size on basicranial form in human and primate evolution. Journal of Human Evolution 58: 424-431.
DOI : 10.1016/j.jhevol.2010.03.001

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

BAYLE P., BRAGA J., MAZURIER A., MACCHIARELLI R. 2009 - Dental developmental pattern of the Neanderthal child from Roc de Marsal: a high-resolution 3D analysis. Journal of Human Evolution, 56: 66-75.
DOI : 10.1016/j.jhevol.2008.09.002

BOOKSTEIN F. L., GUNZ P., MITTEROECKER P., PROSSINGER H., SCHAEFER K., SEIDLER H. 2003 - Cranial integration in Homo: singular warps analysis of the midsagittal plane in ontogeny and evolution. Journal of Human Evolution, 44 : 167-187.

BORDES F., LAFILLE J. 1962 - Découverte d’un squelette d’enfant moustérien dans le gisement du Roc de Marsal, commune de Campagne-du-Bugue (Dordogne). C.R. Acad.Sci. Paris, 254 : 714-15.

BOULE M. 1911-1913 - L’homme fossile de La Chapelle-aux-Saints. Paris: Masson.

BRUNER E. 2004 - Geometric morphometrics and paleoneurology: brain shape evolution in the genus Homo. Journal of Human Evolution, 47: 279-303.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

BRUNER E. 2010 - Morphological Differences in the Parietal Lobes within the Human Genus. Current Anthropology, 51: 77-88.
DOI : 10.1086/650729

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

BRUNER E., MANZI G., ARSUAGA J.-L. 2003 - Encephalization and allometric trajectories in the genus Homo: evidence from the Neandertal and modern lineages. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 100: 15335-340.
DOI : 10.1073/pnas.2536671100

BUSK G. 1864 - Pithecoid priscan man from Gibraltar. The Reader: 23.

ENLOW D. H. 1968 - The human face. New York: Harper & Row.

ENLOW D. H., Hans M. G. 1996 - Essentials of facial growth. Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders Company.

FEREMBACH D., LEGOUX P., FENART R., EMPEREUR-BUISSON R., VLE ?K E. 1970 - L’enfant du Pech-de-L’Azé. Archives de l’Institut de Paléontologie Humaine. Paris : Masson et Cie.

FRAIPONT C. 1936 - Les hommes fossiles d’Engis. Archives de l’Institut de Paléontologie Humaine, mém. 16. Paris : Masson.

GOLOVANOVA L., HOFFECKER D. F., NESMEYANOV S., LEVKOVSKAYA G., KHARITONOV V., ROMANOVA G., SVEJENCEVE I. 1998 - Un site micoquien est-européen (résultats préliminaires de l’étude de la grotte Mezmaiskaya, les fouilles des années 1987-1993). L’Anthropologie (Paris), 102: 45-66.

GRINE F. E., BAILEY R. M., HARVATI K., NATHAN R. P., MORRIS A. G., HENDERSON G. M., RIBOT I., PIKE A. W., 2007 - Late Pleistocene human skull from Hofmeyr, South Africa, and modern human origins. Science, 315: 226-29.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

GRINE F. E., GUNZ P., BETTI-NASH L., NEUBAUER S., MORRIS A. G. 2010 - Reconstruction of the Late Pleistocene human skull from Hofmeyr, South Africa. Journal of Human Evolution, 59: 1-15.
DOI : 10.1016/j.jhevol.2010.02.007

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

GUATELLI-STEINBERG D., REID D. J., BISHOP T. A., LARSEN C. S. 2005 - Anterior tooth growth periods in Neandertals were comparable to those of modern humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102: 14197-4202.
DOI : 10.1073/pnas.0503108102

GUNZ P., HARVATI K. 2007 - The Neanderthal « chignon »: variation, integration, and homology. Journal of Human Evolution, 52: 262-274.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

GUNZ P., MITTEROECKER P., BOOKSTEIN F. L. 2005 - Semilandmarks in three dimensions. In Slice D. E. (ed), Modern Morphometrics in Physical Anthropology. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.
DOI : 10.1007/0-387-27614-9_3

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

GUNZ P., BOOKSTEIN F. L., MITTEROECKER P., STADLMAYR A., SEIDLER H., WEBER G. W. 2009a - Early modern human diversity suggests subdivided population structure and a complex out-of-Africa scenario. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106: 6094-98.
DOI : 10.1073/pnas.0808160106

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

GUNZ P., MITTEROECKER P., NEUBAUER S., WEBER G. W., BOOKSTEIN F. L. 2009b - Principles for the virtual reconstruction of hominin crania. Journal of Human Evolution, 57: 48-62.
DOI : 10.1016/j.jhevol.2009.04.004

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

GUNZ P., NEUBAUER S., MAUREILLE B., HUBLIN J.-J. 2010 - Brain development after birth differs between Neanderthals and modern humans. Current Biology, 20: R921-R922.
DOI : 10.1016/j.cub.2010.10.018

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

HARVATI K. 2003 - The Neanderthal taxonomic position: Models of intra- and inter-specific craniofacial variation. Journal of Human Evolution, 44: 107-132.
DOI : 10.1016/S0047-2484(02)00208-7

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

HARVATI K. 2009 - Into Eurasia: a geometric morphometric re-assessment of the Upper Cave (Zhoukoudian) specimens. Journal of Human Evolution, 57: 751-762.
DOI : 10.1016/j.jhevol.2009.07.008

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

HARVATI K., FROST S. R., MCNULTY K. P. 2004 - Neanderthal taxonomy reconsidered: implications of 3D primate models of intra- and interspecific differences. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 101: 1147-152.
DOI : 10.1073/pnas.0308085100

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

HARVATI K., GUNZ P., GRIGORESCU D. 2007 - Cioclovina (Romania): affinities of an early modern European. Journal of Human Evolution, 53 : 732-746.
DOI : 10.1016/j.jhevol.2007.09.009

HEIM J. L. 1974 - Les Hommes fossiles de La Ferrassie (Dordogne) et le problème de la définition des néandertaliens classiques. L’Anthropologie, 78: 81-112.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

HEUZÉ Y., BOYADJIEV S. A., MARSH J. L., KANE A. A., CHERKEZ E., BOGGAN J. E., RICHTSMEIER J. T. 2010 - New insights into the relationship between suture closure and craniofacial dysmorphology in sagittal nonsyndromic craniosynostosis. Journal of Anatomy, 217 : 85-96.
DOI : 10.1111/j.1469-7580.2010.01258.x

KLAATSCH H. 1909 - Preuves que l’Homo Mousteriensis Hauseri. L’Homme Préhistorique, 7 : 10-16.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

LIEBERMAN D. E. 2008 - Speculations about the selective basis for modern human craniofacial form. Evolutionary Anthropology, 17: 55.
DOI : 10.1002/evan.20154

LIEBERMAN D. E., MCBRATNEY B. M., KROVITZ G. 2002 - The evolution and development of cranial form in Homo sapiens. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 99: 1134-39.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

LIEBERMAN D. E., KROVITZ G. E., MCBRATNEY-OWEN B. 2004 - Testing hypotheses about tinkering in the fossil record: the case of the human skull. Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and developmental evolution, 302: 284-301.
DOI : 10.1002/jez.b.21004

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

LIEBERMAN D. E., HALLGRÍMSSONB., LIU W., PARSONS T. E., JAMNICZKY H. A. 2008 - Spatial packing, cranial base angulation, and craniofacial shape variation in the mammalian skull: testing a new model using mice. Journal of Anatomy, 212: 720-735.
DOI : 10.1111/j.1469-7580.2008.00900.x

MACCHIARELLI R., BONDIOLI L., DEBÉNATH A., MAZURIER A., TOURNEPICHE J.-F., BIRCH W., DEAN M. C. 2006 - How Neanderthal molar teeth grew. Nature, 444 : 748-751.

MADRE-DUPOUY M. 1992 - L’enfant du Roc du Marsal . Paris : éd. du CNRS.

MAUREILLE B. 1994 (unpublished) - La face chez Homo erectus et Homo sapiens. Recherche sur la variabilité morphologique et métrique. Thèse de l’Université Bordeaux 1, école doctorale de biologie, spécialité anthropologie, n° d’ordre 1079.

MAUREILLE B. 2002a - A lost Neanderthal neonate found. Nature, 419 : 33-34.

MAUREILLE B. 2002b - La redécouverte du nouveau-né néandertalien Le Moustier 2. Paléo, 14: 221-238.

MAUREILLE B. 2005 - The rediscovery of Le Moustier 2 Neandertal specimen. In, Ullrich H. (ed.), The Neanderthal adolescent Le Moustier 1. Berliner Beiträge zur vor- und frühgeschichte neue folge, band 12. Berlin : Staalische Museen zu Berlin – Preußishcer Kulturbesitz, pp. 63-72.

MAUREILLE B. 2007 - Portrait d’un Néandertalien d’Europe de l’Ouest. In, Vandermeersch B. et Maureille B., 2007 (éds), Les Néandertaliens, biologie et cultures. Documents préhistoriques 23, Paris: C.T.H.S.

MAUREILLE B. BAR D. 1999 - The Premaxilla in the Neandertal and Qafzeh-Skhul Children: Ontogeny and Morphology. Journal of Human Evolution, 37: 137-152.

MAUREILLE B., MAJOUFRE-LEFEBVRE Cl. 2003 - The Neandertal perinate from Le Moustier: an exceptional specimen. The Italian Journal of Pediatrics, 29: 161-164.

MITTEROECKER P., GUNZ P. 2009 - Advances in Geometric Morphometrics. Evolutionary Biology, 36: 235-247.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

MOSS M. L., Young R. W. 1960 - A functional approach to craniology. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 18: 281-292.
DOI : 10.1002/ajpa.1330180406

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

NEUBAUER S., GUNZ P., HUBLIN J.-J. 2009 - The pattern of endocranial ontogenetic shape changes in humans. Journal of Anatomy, 215: 240-255.
DOI : 10.1111/j.1469-7580.2009.01106.x

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

NEUBAUER S., GUNZ P., HUBLIN J.-J. 2010 - Endocranial shape changes during growth in chimpanzees and humans: a morphometric analysis of unique and shared aspects. Journal of Human Evolution, 59: 555-566.
DOI : 10.1016/j.jhevol.2010.06.011

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

NICHOLSON E., HARVATI K. 2006 - Quantitative analysis of human mandibular shape using three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 131 : 368-383.
DOI : 10.1002/ajpa.20425

PATTE E. 1957 - L’enfant néanderthalien du Pech de l’Azé. Masson et Cie : Paris.

PEYRONY D. 1930 - Le Moustier, ses gisements, ses industries, ses couches géologiques. Revue d’Anthropologie, 1930, 40: 48-76 et 155-176.

PEARSON O. M. 2008 - Statistical and biological definitions of anatomically modern humans: Suggestions for a unified approach to modern morphology. Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews, 17: 38-48.

PONCE DE LEÓN M. S. 2002 - Computerized Paleoanthropology and Neanderthals: The Case of Le Moustier 1. Evolutionary Anthropology, 11: 68-72.

PONCE DE LEÓN M. S., ZOLLIKOFER C. P. 2001 - Neanderthal cranial ontogeny and its implications for late hominid diversity. Nature, 412: 534-38.

PONCE DE LEÓN M. S., GOLOVANOVA L., DORONICHEV V., ROMANOVA G., AKAZAWA T., KONDO O., ISHIDA H., ZOLLIKOFER C. P. 2008 - Neanderthal brain size at birth provides insights into the evolution of human life history. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 105: 13764-68.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

RAK Y. 1986 - The Neanderthal: A New Look at an Old Face. Journal of Human Evolution, 15: 151-164.
DOI : 10.1016/S0047-2484(86)80042-2

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

RAMIREZ ROZZI F. V., BERMUDEZ DE CASTRO J. M. 2004 - Surprisingly rapid growth in Neanderthals. Nature, 428: 936-39.
DOI : 10.1038/nature02428

REID D. J., GUATELLI-STEINBERG D., WALTON P. 2008 - Variation in modern human premolar enamel formation times: implications for Neandertals. Journal of Human Evolution, 54: 225-235.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

RICHTSMEIER J. T., ALDRIDGE K., DELEON V. B., PANCHAL J., KANE A. A., MARSH J. L., YAN P., COLE T. M. 2006 - Phenotypic integration of neurocranium and brain. Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and developmental evolution, 306: 360-378.
DOI : 10.1002/jez.b.21092

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

RICHTSMEIER J. T., DELEON V. B. 2009 - Morphological integration of the skull in craniofacial anomalies. Orthodontic Craniofacial Research, 12: 149-158.
DOI : 10.1111/j.1601-6343.2009.01448.x

ROSAS A. 2001 - Occurrence of neanderthal features in mandibles from the Atapuerca-SH site. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 114: 74-91.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

ROSAS A., BASTIR M., ALARCÓN J. A., KUROE K. 2008 - Thin-plate spline analysis of the cranial base in African, Asian and European populations and its relationship with different malocclusions. Archives of Oral Biology, 53 : 826-834.
DOI : 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2008.02.005

SCHMERLING P. C. 1833 - Recherches sur des ossements fossiles decouverts dans les cavernes de la province de Liège P.-J. Collardin, Libraire, Imprimeur de L’Université : Liège.

SERGI S., ASCENZI A. 1974 - Il cranio neandertaliano del Monte Circeo (Circeo I). Rome: Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei Rome.

SMITH, T. M., TAFFOREAU P., REID D. J., GRÜN R., EGGINS S., BOUTAKIOUT M., HUBLIN J.-J. 2007 - Earliest evidence of modern human life history in North African early Homo sapiens. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 104: 6128-6133.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

SMITH T. M., TOUSSAINT M., REID D. J., OLEJNICZAK A. J., HUBLIN J.-J. 2007 - Rapid dental development in a Middle Paleolithic Belgian Neanderthal. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 104: 20220-20225.
DOI : 10.1073/pnas.0707051104

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

SMITH T. M., TAFFOREAU P., REID D. J., POUECH J., LAZZARI V., ZERMENO J. P., GUATELLI-STEINBERG D., OLEJNICZAK A. J., HOFFMAN A., RADOVCIC J., MAKAREMI M., TOUSSAINT M., STRINGER C., HUBLIN J.-J. 2010 - Dental evidence for ontogenetic differences between modern humans and Neanderthals. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107: 20923-20928.
DOI : 10.1073/pnas.1010906107

SPERBER G. H. 1989 - Craniofacial embryology. London: John Wright.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

STRINGER C. B., HOWELL F. C., MELENTIS J. K. 1979 - The significance of the fossil hominid skull from Petralona, Greece. Journal of Archaeological Science, 6: 235-253.
DOI : 10.1016/0305-4403(79)90002-5

TILLIER A. M. 1996 - The Pech de l’Azé and Roc-de-Marsal children (Middle Paleolithic, France): skeletal evidence for variation in Neanderthal ontogeny. Human Evolution, 11: 113-119.

TRINKAUS E. 1983 - The Shanidar neandertals. New York: Academic press.

VANDERMEERSCH B. 1981 - Les Hommes fossiles de Qafzeh (Israël). Cahiers de Paléontologie. Paris : éds. du C.N.R.S.

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

WEAVER T. D., HUBLIN J.-J. 2009 - Neandertal birth canal shape and the evolution of human childbirth. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106: 8151-8156.
DOI : 10.1073/pnas.0812554106

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

WOODWARD A. S. 1921 - A new cave man from Rhodesia, South Africa. Nature, 108: 371-72.
DOI : 10.1038/108371a0

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

ZOLLIKOFER C. P. E. 2002 - A Computational Approach to Paleoanthropology. Evolutionary Anthropology, 11: 64-67.
DOI : 10.1002/evan.10059

Format
APA
MLA
Chicago
The Bibliographic Export Service is accessible via institutions subscribing to one OpenEdition freemium programs.
If you wish your institution to become a subscriber to one OpenEdition freemium programs and thus benefit from our services, please write to: access@openedition.org.

ZOLLIKOFER C. P. E., PONCE DE LEÓN M. S., MARTIN R. D. 1998 - Computer-assisted paleoanthropology. Evolutionary Anthropology, 6: 41-54.
DOI : 10.1002/(SICI)1520-6505(1998)6:2<41::AID-EVAN2>3.0.CO;2-Z

ZOLLIKOFER C. P. E., PONCE DE LEÓN M. S. 2009 - The evolution of hominin ontogenies. Semin Cell Dev Biol, 21: 441-452.

Top of page

Annex

Abridged english version

Introduction

Le squelette d’un nouveau-né néandertalien a été découvert en 1914 par Denis Peyrony lors de fouilles de l’abri sous-roche inférieur du Moustier (Peyzac-Le Moustier, Dordogne ; Peyrony 1930 ; Maureille 2002a). Les ossements originaux du squelette avaient été égarés pendant plus de 80 ans, jusqu’à ce que l’un de nous (B.M.), en collaboration avec le personnel du Musée National de Préhistoire des Eyzies-de-Tayac-Sireuil, les redécouvre en 1996 (Maureille 2002b). Ces derniers ont été restaurés et le squelette original de ce nouveau-né néandertalien fait actuellement partie de l’exposition permanente du Musée. Le fossile présente presque tous les éléments du crâne, la face et la base du crâne étant particulièrement bien conservées à l’exception du corps du sphénoïde.

Nous présentons ici une reconstruction virtuelle du crâne de ce fossile, basée sur des données tomodensitomètriques numérisées à haute résolution (µCT). Cet article complète notre analyse récente des changements de la forme endocrânienne lors de l’ontogénie postnatale chez les Hommes modernes et les Néandertaliens (Gunz et al. 2010), analyse qui intégrait déjà cette reconstruction du Moustier 2. Les objectifs de notre contribution sont de : 1) fournir une description détaillée du protocole de la reconstruction virtuelle, 2) comparer notre reconstruction du crâne du Moustier 2 avec celles de nouveaux-nés modernes et à la reconstruction virtuelle du nouveau-né néandertalien de Mezmaiskaya (Golovanova et al. 1998) par M. P. de León et Ch. Zollikofer (Ponce de León et al. 2008) et 3) discuter des implications de nos résultats sur les différences ontogénétiques entre Néandertaliens et Hommes actuels.

Matériel et méthodes

En novembre 2008, les ossements et fragments d’ossements crâniens, très fragiles, du fossile néandertalien Le Moustier 2 ont été scannés, avec une résolution isotrope des voxels de 70 µm, au Musée National de Préhistoire des Eyzies-de-Tayac-Sireuil avec le scanner portable industriel µCT (BIR ACTIS 225/300) du Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology de Leipzig (MPI-EVA).

Nous avons utilisé le progiciel Avizo (Visualization Sciences Group Inc.) afin d’extraire les isosurfaces des données volumétriques. Les fragments individuels ont été ensuite assemblés comme un puzzle tridimensionnel au Virtual Reality Lab du MPI-EVA. Si certaines parties manquaient d’un côté, ou si elles étaient mieux conservées d’un côté plutôt que de l’autre, nous avons utilisé Avizo pour les matérialiser par effet miroir relativement au plan médian du crâne.

Naturellement, toute reconstruction de pièces déformées ou manquantes est fondée sur des postulats (voir Gunz et al. 2009b) qui ont un impact potentiel sur nos résultats. Notre reconstruction du crâne du nouveau-né Le Moustier 2 est fondée sur les postulats suivants : 1) nous avons défini un plan médian et nous avons reconstruit le crâne comme si il était parfaitement symétrique, 2) nous savons que toutes les sutures de ce nouveau-né étaient encore ouvertes. Cela est aisément observable sur les éléments osseux conservés. 3) nous avons présumé que le modèle de l’espacement des sutures était identique chez ce nouveau-né néandertalien relativement à ce que l’on peut observer chez les périnatals actuels (collection de spécimens conservés dans du formol). Il en a été de même pour la reconstruction virtuelle du nouveau-né néandertalien Mezmaiskaya 1 (Ponce de León et al. 2008). Notre algorithme informatique pour l’estimation des données manquantes considère que les modèles à grande échelle d’intégration morphologique entre les parties crâniennes sont semblables chez l’Homme moderne et l’Homme de Néandertal et enfin, 4) nous avons supposé que la déformation plastique des fragments crâniens était négligeable, à l’exception du fragment occipital, des pariétaux, et de la partie conservée de l’hémi-frontal droit (fig. 1).

Conservation et déformation plastique : le squelette du Moustier 2 en général, et certaines parties du crâne en particulier, sont exceptionnellement bien conservés. Néanmoins, nous avons pu déceler une certaine déformation plastique sur de nombreux fragments crâniens dont les pariétaux, l’écaille occipitale et l’hémi-frontal gauche (fig. 1). Ce n’est pas une coïncidence si les fragments les plus grands et les moins épais montrent des indices de déformation plastique. Ces pièces se sont très probablement aplaties post-mortem en raison du poids des sédiments et de la plasticité de l’os. Ceci est facile à démontrer pour l’hémi-frontal droit puisque l’hémi-frontal gauche est également préservé (fig. 1 et 2). Les os pariétaux sont mieux conservés que ce qui est actuellement restauré, toutefois ils ont été tellement fragmentés qu’ils ne peuvent être, pour le moment, assemblés de manière totalement fiable. Finalement, pour notre reconstitution du crâne de ce bébé, nous avons employé le plus grand fragment du pariétal droit.

Protocole de la reconstruction virtuelle

Lors de la première phase de reconstruction, nous nous sommes servis de références anatomiques (Zollikofer et al. 1998 ; Zollikofer 2002 ; Ponce de León et al. 2008 ; Gunz et al. 2009b ; Gunz et al. 2010) afin d’assembler avec Avizo les fragments et leurs images-miroirs. Etant donné que la face (maxillaire droit, os zygomatique gauche, os nasaux, hémi-mandibule droite) et les éléments de la base crânienne sont quasiment complets, il est possible de disposer les pièces de cette partie du crâne de manière presque parfaite.

Assemblage des fragments : si nous avons scanné les éléments du crâne les mieux conservés (cf. supra et fig. 1), les scanners des deux os nasaux et des deux hémi-frontaux ont été réalisés. Ces pièces imposent des contraintes géométriques quant à la largeur du crâne et autorisent donc une reconstitution symétrique de la face. Ainsi, la forme de la mandibule obtenue après imagerie miroir contraint la reconstruction de la base du crâne puisque les exigences de l’équilibre crânio-facial déterminent sa largeur (fig. 1 et 2).

Correction de la déformation plastique de l’os occipital : comme mentionné ci-dessus, l’écaille occipitale est déformée post-mortem. Elle est aplatie (fig. 1). Nous avons tenté de corriger cette déformation en prenant l’image miroir du côté gauche, mieux préservé, et en considérant le plan médian de la pièce (et donc du crâne) aisément positionnable. La figure 1 montre que cela entraîne malgré tout un léger aplatissement de l’écaille occipitale et que cette partie du crâne est peut-être plus plate qu’elle ne l’était originellement (cf. infra discussion et voir fig. S2 in Gunz et al. 2010 supplemental information).

Estimation du volume endocrânien : Notre échantillon comprend les crânes de 58 Hommes actuels, de la naissance à l’âge adulte (pour plus de détails concernant cet échantillon voir Neubauer et al. ibidem) et une série de 8 Néandertaliens soit : Pech-de-L’Azé 1 (Patte 1957 ; Ferembach et al. 1970), Roc-de-Marsal 1 (Bordes et Lafille 1962 ; Madre-Dupouy 1992), Engis 2 (Schmerling 1833 ; Fraipont 1936), Le Moustier 1 (Klaatsch 1909 ; 2005), Guattari 1 (Sergi et Ascenzi 1974), La Ferrassie 1 (Heim 1974), Forbes’ Quarry (Busk 1864), La Chapelle-aux-Saints 1 (Boule 1911) et 2 Homo archaïques (Kabwe 1 (Woodward 1921) et Pétralona (Stringer et al. 1979).

Nous avons essayé d’estimer au mieux les parties manquantes de la boîte crânienne. Pour ce faire, nous avons employé un protocole de morphométrie géométrique que nous (P. G.) avons établi (pour plus de détails voir Gunz et al. 2009b) et qui est basé sur un référentiel de crânes complets (Mitteroecker and Gunz 2009). Tout d’abord, suivant le protocole de Neubauer et collaborateurs (Neubauer et al. 2009 ; Neubauer et al. 2010), pour chaque spécimen, nous avons généré des endocrânes virtuels par segmentation semi-automatisée des images CT. Puis, nous avons ensuite numérisé les coordonnées tridimensionnelles de landmarks (points de repère anatomiques) et semi-landmarks (points sur des courbes et des surfaces ; pour les détails voir Gunz et al. 2005).

Les points de repères qui ne pouvaient être déterminés sur Le Moustier 2 ont été estimés via la méthode d’interpolation Thin-Plate Spline (TPS), entre un crâne de nouveau-né actuel et le fossile néandertalien (Gunz et al. 2009b). Nous avons donc fait glisser les semi-landmarks sur les courbes et surfaces respectives du fossile afin de minimiser les problèmes. Les coordonnées manquantes de ces points ont ainsi été définies après cette interpolation. Ce processus a été répété pour tous les crânes afin de générer des reconstructions multiples.

Les volumes endocrâniens ont été estimés, pour chaque reconstruction, par déformation de type TPS de la surface endocrânienne, depuis le crâne de référence jusqu’à la configuration reconstruite par les landmarks et semi-landmarks. A partir de ces surfaces reconstruites, les volumes ont été mesurés avec Avizo.
Les capacités endocrâniennes des différentes reconstructions du nouveau-né néandertalien Le Moustier 2 varient entre 408 et 428 cm3. À la naissance, les nouveaux-nés actuels et ceux néandertaliens semblent donc avoir des volumes endocrâniens voisins (Gunz et al. 2010).

Nouveaux-nés néandertaliens et actuels : traits osseux.

De nombreuses caractéristiques morphologiques différencient les adultes néandertaliens des adultes modernes et nous avons déjà soulignées qu’elles sont mises en place à la naissance (Maureille 2002a, 2002b, 2005 ; Maureille et Majoufre 2003).

La face est plus haute et plus large, plus saillante dans le plan médian chez Le Moustier 2 que chez des nouveaux-nés actuels (figure 3). L’ouverture nasale chez le fossile est aussi plus haute et plus large et les os nasaux sont plus longs et coudés comme chez les adultes (Maureille 1994). La hauteur de l’orbite du Moustier 2 est nettement plus grande que chez les nouveaux-nés actuels et la forme de cette région anatomique évoque déjà la morphologie caractéristique des Néandertaliens européens (fig. 1 et 2 ; Maureille 2005, 2007).

Les différences de la base crânienne entre Le Moustier 2 et les nouveaux-nés actuels paraissent plus subtiles (fig. 2 et 3 ; voir aussi Maureille 2002b, 2005). Le foramen magnum du Moustier 2 est légèrement plus allongé que chez les nouveaux-nés actuels (Rak 1986). Toutefois, il est difficile de déterminer sa longueur exacte car les sutures entre les quatre éléments de la base du crâne entourant le foramen magnum sont encore ouvertes chez les nouveaux-nés.

En revanche, la forme de l’hémi-mandibule différencie clairement Le Moustier 2 des nouveaux-nés actuels. Elle présente une morphologie qui rappelle celle de l’adulte néandertalien (figure 4). Par exemple, l’échancrure sigmoïde semble peu profonde (Rak 1986), la région goniaque est plus arrondie et moins anguleuse comme cela a été récemment souligné (par exemple Rosas 2001).

Discussion

La validité des hypothèses antérieures, qui étayent toute reconstruction de matériel fossile partiellement conservé et déformé, est primordiale pour la qualité de la reconstitution (Gunz et al. 2009b). Nous allons donc discuter de l’impact potentiel de ces hypothèses sur celle du Moustier 2, tout particulièrement en ce qui concerne les différences « développementales » entre les Hommes actuels et les Néandertaliens (Gunz et al. 2010 et fig. 5).

L’étude des changements de la forme endocrânienne des Hommes actuels et des Néandertaliens depuis la naissance jusqu’à l’âge adulte, nous a permis de démontrer que les crânes actuels subissent une phase de « globularisation » pendant la première année de la vie. Les changements de forme pendant cette année comprennent une croissance relative des os pariétaux et de l’occipital et une flexion de la base du crâne (Neubauer et al. 2009 ; Neubauer et al. 2010). Cette phase semble absente chez les Néandertaliens. Elle pourrait donc être spécifique aux Hommes actuels (Gunz et al. 2010 ; Neubauer et al. 2010).

Les boîtes crâniennes des adultes néandertaliens sont plus allongées que celles des adultes actuels (Boule 1911-1913 ; Bruner et al. 2003 ; Bruner 2004 ; Bruner and Manzi 2008 ; Lieberman et al. 2002 ; Lieberman et al. 2004 ; Lieberman 2008 ; Lieberman et al. 2008 ; Neubauer et al. 2009 ; Gunz and Harvati 2007 ; Grine et al. 2007 ; Harvati 2009 ; Trinkaus 1983 ; Vandermeersch 1981). Pour que le modèle de changement de forme pendant le développement soit similaire entre les Hommes actuels et les Néandertaliens (c’est-à-dire pour que les Néandertaliens aient une « phase de globularisation » comme les Hommes actuels), la boîte crânienne d’un nouveau-né néandertalien devrait alors être extrêmement allongée. Or, la reconstruction de celle du Moustier 2, telle que nous l’avons produite, représente la forme la plus allongée possible.

Hypothèses antérieures : nous devons supposer que le spécimen original est parfaitement symétrique. Cette hypothèse est donc réductrice, car nous ignorons délibérément l’asymétrie bilatérale. Mais, pour la reconstitution de la boîte crânienne d’un nouveau-né, elle semble avoir un impact négligeable sur nos comparaisons. Dans notre analyse statistique sur les changements de forme endocrânienne pendant le développement (Gunz et al. 2010), nous avons également retiré les données concernant l’asymétrie de tous les spécimens (par reflected relabeling) et pas seulement pour les crânes fossiles reconstitué (pour plus de détails voir les suppementary information dans Gunz et al. 2010).

Par ailleurs, notre reconstruction est fondée sur l’hypothèse que toutes les sutures crâniennes du Moustier 2 étaient toujours ouvertes et que l’espacement des bords suturaires pouvait être estimé comme voisin de celui de spécimens actuels (voir aussi Ponce de León et al. 2008). La morphologie des ossements du Moustier 2 (fig. 1) montre clairement que ses sutures étaient encore ouvertes. Pour le moment, il est impossible de tester l’exactitude de la deuxième partie de cette hypothèse mais on doit noter qu’un resserrement de l’espacement entre les pièces osseuses des sutures interosseuses des reconstructions montrées dans les figures 1, 2, 3 et 6 entraînerait une forme encore plus globulaire du crâne du Moustier 2. Enfin, la reconstitution de la mandibule nous assure (cf. supra) que la diminution de l’espacement ne peut se faire sans un certain réalisme anatomique. Le même raisonnement s’applique à la correction de l’aplatissement taphonomique de l’écaille de l’os occipital. Nous avons souligné ci-dessus que sa compensation en utilisant une image-miroir d’une partie de l’écaille ne corrige pas complètement cette distorsion. Aucune autre correction additionnelle n’a donc été apportée à cette dernière afin de ne pas biaiser les résultats de notre étude sur les changements de la forme endocrânienne néandertalienne durant l’ontogénie. Mais, cette reconstruction assez « plate » de l’écaille occipitale du Moustier 2 représente un biais n’allant pas dans le sens de l’hypothèse sur l’existence de modèles développementaux différents après la naissance, entre Néandertaliens et Hommes actuels. In fine, la diminution de l’espacement entre les bords suturaires et des corrections additionnelles de la distorsion occipitale aboutiraient à une forme plus arrondie de l’endocrâne. Une telle forme, plus globulaire relativement à celle illustrée avec les figures 1, 2, 3, 4 et 6, de la boîte crânienne du Moustier 2, accentuerait encore plus les différences développementales entre les Hommes actuelles et les Néandertaliens par rapport à celles que nous avons produites (Gunz et al. 2010).

Enfin, l’estimation par Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) des parties manquantes de la boîte crânienne ont, sans doute, l’impact le plus grand sur la reconstitution et le volume de l’encéphale. Nous avons montré précédemment que les différentes parties de l’endocrâne sont étroitement corrélées (Gunz et Harvati 2007). De plus, les modèles d’intégration des relations réciproques entre ces parties sont globalement similaires entre les Hommes actuels et les Néandertaliens (entre autres Bookstein et al. 2003 ; Gunz et Harvati 2007). Pour tous les spécimens (fossiles et échantillon de référence) des reconstructions multiples ont donc été produites (ce qui permet de « jouer » avec l’impact de l’estimation par TPS). Ainsi, nous croyons que les valeurs des volumes endocrâniens estimés pour Le Moustier 2 représentent une estimation raisonnable malgré les incertitudes liées à ces estimations (Gunz et al. 2009a ; Gunz et al. 2009b ; Grine et al. 2010).

Enfin, la reconstruction virtuelle du crâne du bébé Le Moustier 2 va dans le sens des résultats de nombreuses études antérieures sur les Néandertaliens immatures (par exemple Nicholson et Harvati 2006 ; Weaver et Hublin 2009 ; Zollikofer et Ponce de León 2009 ; Ponce de León et al. 2008 ; Bastir et al. 2007 ; 2005 ; Ponce de León 2002 ; Maureille 1994 ; 2002a et b, 2005 ; Ponce de León et Zollikofer 2001 ; Tillier 1996). La face des nouveaux-nés néandertaliens est plus grande que celle des nouveaux-nés actuels. Dès la naissance, ou autour du terme, des traits néandertaliens existent, par exemple au niveau de l’orbite (sa forme, son volume), l’absence de dépression infra-orbitaire, la projection de la partie médiane du massif facial supérieur, la taille et la forme du nez, la forme de l’échancrure sigmoïde mandibulaire. Nous observons aussi des différences importantes au niveau du de la base du crâne sur le corps du sphénoïde, les pars lateralis et basilaris de l’occipital. Mais nos reconstitutions virtuelles de la boîte crânienne montrent que les formes et les volumes endocrâniens à la naissance étaient très similaires entre les Hommes actuels et les Néandertaliens, les endocrânes des nouveaux-nés néandertaliens étant seulement un peu plus allongés que ceux des nouveaux-nés actuels.

Rappelons aussi que notre reconstruction du crâne du Moustier 2 est compatible avec celle du nouveau-né néandertalien de la grotte de Mezmaiskaya (Russie) tel qu’il a été reconstruit par Ponce de León et collaborateurs (Ponce de León et al. 2008). Ce spécimen semble encore mieux conservé pour cette partie du corps que Le Moustier 2. La face du nouveau-né Mezmaiskaya 1 est aussi plus grande et plus saillante que chez un nouveau-né actuel. Si les os nasaux ne sont pas conservés, l’ouverture nasale paraît aussi large et haute que chez Le Moustier 2. La forme de l’orbite et la morphologie mandibulaire de Mezmaiskaya 1 montrent des caractéristiques néandertaliennes. Enfin, les volumes endocrâniens reconstruits pour Mezmaiskaya 1 varient entre 422 et 436 cm3 (Ponce de León et al. 2008). Ceux du Moustier 2 se situent entre 408 et 428 cm3. Les volumes endocrâniens à la naissance seraient donc similaires chez les Hommes actuels et chez les Néandertaliens.

Implications pour l’ontogénie des Néandertaliens : les comparaisons des reconstructions crâniennes des deux nouveaux-nés néandertaliens les plus complets (Le Moustier 2 et Mezmaiskaya 1) avec des bébés actuels s’accompagnent des mêmes résultats. Les caractéristiques faciales – y compris leurs dimensions – des fossiles peuvent être mises en évidence. Donc, elles se mettent en place lors de la croissance fœtale. Pour les deux groupes humains, la forme des boîtes crâniennes (et donc des endocrânes), à la naissance, est allongée. De plus, les volumes endocrâniens sont similaires. Etant donné qu’à l’âge adulte, la forme globulaire du neurocrâne différencie les Homo sapiens sapiens de tous les autres fossiles humains, y compris les néandertaliens (Ponce de León et Zollikofer 2001 ; Lieberman et al. 2002 ; Lieberman et al. 2004 ; Harvati 2003 ; Harvati et al. 2004 ; Bastir et al. 2006 ; Gunz et Harvati 2007 ; Harvati et al. 2007 ; Grine et al. 2007 ; Pearson 2008 ; Bastir et al. 2008 ; Bastir et al. 2008 ; Bastir et al. 2010 ; Gunz et al. 2009a ; Harvati 2009), la forme caractéristique du crâne actuel se met en place après la naissance. Pendant les premières années de la vie, les os crâniens sont peu épais et les sutures sont largement ouvertes. Les changements de la forme de la boîte crânienne pourraient donc essentiellement être dictés par l’expansion rapide du cerveau (Moss et Young 1960 ; Richtsmeier et al. 2006 ; Richtsmeier et Deleon 2009 ; Heuzé et al. 2010 ; Enlow 1968 ; Enlow et Hans 1996). Alors que la croissance de la face affecte celle de la base du crâne (et vice-versa ; Sperber 1989 ; Bastir et Rosas 2006 ; Rosas et al. 2008 ; Bastir 2008 ; Bastir et Rosas 2009 ; Bastir et al. 2010 ; Bookstein et al. 2003 ; Neubauer et al. 2009 ; Neubauer et al. 2010), il est peu probable que les changements de forme des os pariétaux et de l’écaille occipitale pendant « la phase de globularisation » des Hommes actuels puissent être expliqués uniquement par ces facteurs.

Des études sur la croissance du cerveau (Ponce de León et al. 2008 ; Zollikofer et Ponce de León 2009) suggèrent que certains aspects du développement néandertalien étaient plus rapides que chez les Hommes actuels. Il en est de même avec d’autres études sur le développement dentaire (Ramirez Rozzi et Bermudez De Castro 2004 ; Smith et al. 2007 ; Smith et al. 2007 ; Smith et al. 2010) et bien qu’il existe des recouvrements (Guatelli-Steinberg et al. 2005 ; Macchiarelli et al. 2006 ; Reid et al. 2008 ; Bayle et al. 2009). D’autres recherches traduiraient l’existence de fonctionnement suturaire plus long chez les Néandertaliens que les Hommes actuels (Maureille et Bar, 1999). Toutefois, la phase de globularisation reflèterait plutôt des différences de rythme dans le développement du cerveau entre les Hommes actuels et les Néandertaliens. En se basant sur les études comparatives d’endocrânes adultes, Bruner et collaborateurs (Bruner et al. 2003 ; Bruner 2004 ; Bruner et Manzi 2008 ; Bruner 2010) ont suggéré qu’il existait des différences quant à l’encéphalisation entre les Hommes modernes et les Néandertaliens. De telles différences doivent trouver leurs origines dans des processus ontogéniques distincts. Cependant, il n’était pas encore possible de savoir à partir de quelle classe d’âge ces différences s’exprimaient. Nous avons montré que celles qui affectent la face existent avant la naissance alors que celles de la forme de la boîte crânienne et de l’endocrâne (donc du cerveau) se mettent en place après la naissance.

Les Hommes actuels et les Néandertaliens atteindraient donc une capacité endocrânienne adulte à travers des cheminements ontogénétiques différents.

Top of page

List of illustrations

Title Figure 1 - Virtual reconstruction of Le Moustier 2.Figure 1 - Reconstruction virtuelle du Moustier 2.
Caption Mirror-imaged parts are plotted in a darker shade. Only the right frontal bone fragment and the occipital bone fragment (red) show clear signs of plastic deformation. We attempted to correct the deformation of the occipital bone by mirror-imaging the better-preserved side; this reconstructed shape is drawn in a darker shade.Les parties reconstituées par une image-miroir sont représentées avec une nuance sombre. L’hémi-frontal droit et l’écaille occipitale (en rouge) présentent une nette déformation plastique. Nous avons essayé de corriger la déformation de l’os occipital en faisant une image-miroir de la partie la mieux conservée.
URL http://paleo.revues.org/docannexe/image/2107/img-1.jpg
File image/jpeg, 324k
Title Figure 2 - Virtual reconstruction of Le Moustier 2 compared to a modern human neonate (lower right).Figure 2 - Reconstitution virtuelle du crâne du Moustier 2 comparée à celle d’un nouveau-né actuel (en bas à droite).
Caption Colour coding as in Figure 1, except for the occiptal bone fragment that is drawn as a semitransparent surface. The arrows highlight the plastic deformations of the occipital and the right frontal bone. The lower right panel shows a modern human neonate in the same orientation as Le Moustier 2; the parietal bones are semi-transparent to reveal the cranial base.Même codes couleurs que pour la figure 1, excepté pour l’écaille occipitale qui est vue en semi-transparence. Les flèches soulignent les déformations plastiques de l’écaille occipitale et l’hémi-frontal droit. Les deux figures du bas représentent un crâne de nouveau-né actuel (à droite) orienté comme celui du Moustier 2 (à gauche). Sur le premier, les pariétaux sont représentés en semi-transparence pour montrer la base du crâne.
URL http://paleo.revues.org/docannexe/image/2107/img-2.jpg
File image/jpeg, 444k
Title Figure 3 - Le Moustier 2 (left panel) and a modern human neonate (right panel).Figure 3 - Le Moustier 2 (à gauche) et un nouveau-né actuel (à droite).
Caption Mirror-imaged parts are plotted in a darker shade. The shallow sigmoid notch, as well as the rounded gonial area are typical Neandertal traits that can already be observed in this newborn specimen.Les parties représentées par une image-miroir sont représentées avec une nuance plus sombre. La faible échancrure sigmoïde et la région goniaque arrondie, typiques des Néandertaliens adultes, peuvent déjà être observées sur ce nouveau-né fossile.
URL http://paleo.revues.org/docannexe/image/2107/img-3.jpg
File image/jpeg, 228k
Title Figure 4 - Mandibles of Le Moustier 2 (left panel) and a modern human neonate (right panel).Figure 4 - Mandibule du Moustier 2 (à gauche) et d’un nouveau-né actuel (à droite).
Caption Mirror-imaged parts are plotted in a darker shade. The shallow sigmoid notch, as well as the rounded gonial area are typical Neandertal traits that can already be observed in this newborn specimen.Les parties représentées par une image-miroir sont représentées avec une nuance plus sombre. La faible échancrure sigmoïde et la région goniaque arrondie, typiques des Néandertaliens adultes, peuvent déjà être observées sur ce nouveau-né fossile.
URL http://paleo.revues.org/docannexe/image/2107/img-4.jpg
File image/jpeg, 156k
Title Figure 5 - Principal component analysis of postnatal endocranial shape changes.Figure 5 - Analyses en composantes principales des changements de forme du volume endocrânien après la naissance.
Caption Endocranial shape differences between modern humans (blue) and Neanderthals (red) develop largely after birth. Between dental age groups 1 and 2 (based on dental eruption patterns (1: no teeth erupted, 2: incomplete deciduous dentition)), the endocast of modern humans changes from an elongated to a more globular shape, as the cranial base flexes and the occipital and parietal bones « bulge ». The red disks represent the reconstruction uncertainty of incomplete fossil specimens, based on multiple reconstructions of the same endocast. Note that the reconstruction distributions of Le Moustier 2 (age group 1) and Pech-de-L’Azé 1 (age group 3) overlap. Neanderthals therefore lack the « globularization phase » directly after birth.Les différences concernant la forme du volume endocrânien entre les Hommes modernes (en bleu) et les Néandertaliens (en rouge) se mettent en place seulement après la naissance. Entre les groupes 1 et 2 (basés sur l’éruption des dents (1 : aucune dent déciduale en place, 2 : dentition déciduale partiellement en place)), l’endocrâne des sujets modernes change en passant d’une forme allongée à une forme plus globuleuse s’accompagnant d’une flexion de la base du crâne et d’un bombement des pariétaux et de l’occipital. Les cercles rouges représentent la sphère des possibles des différentes reconstitutions de l’endocrâne des spécimens fossiles incomplets. Notez que la sphère du Moustier 2 (groupe 1) et celle de Pech-de-l’Azé 1 (groupe 3) se chevauchent. Les Néandertaliens ne semblent pas présenter la phase de « globularisation » qui se met en place rapidement après la naissance chez l’Homme moderne.
Credits Figure modified after Gunz et al. (2010).D’après Gunz et al. (2010), modifié.
URL http://paleo.revues.org/docannexe/image/2107/img-5.jpg
File image/jpeg, 180k
Title Figure 6 - One of the reconstructions of Le Moustier 2.Figure 6 - Une des reconstructions du Moustier 2.
Caption Mirror-imaged parts are plotted in a darker shade. Missing parts of the braincase were estimated using a thin-plate spline interpolation based on hundreds of landmarks and semilandmarks between a modern human neonate and Le Moustier 2.Les parties reconstituées par une image-miroir sont représentées avec une nuance sombre. Les parties manquantes de la boîte crânienne ont été estimées par la méthode d’interpolation Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) basée sur des centaines de landmarks et semilandmarks entre un nouveau-né actuel et Le Moustier 2.
URL http://paleo.revues.org/docannexe/image/2107/img-6.jpg
File image/jpeg, 427k
Top of page

References

Bibliographical reference

Philipp Gunz, Simon Neubauer, Bruno Maureille and Jean-Jacques Hublin, « Virtual reconstruction of the Le Moustier 2 newborn skull. », PALEO, 22 | 2011, 155-172.

Electronic reference

Philipp Gunz, Simon Neubauer, Bruno Maureille and Jean-Jacques Hublin, « Virtual reconstruction of the Le Moustier 2 newborn skull. », PALEO [Online], 22 | 2011, Online since 17 April 2012, connection on 20 December 2014. URL : http://paleo.revues.org/2107

Top of page

About the authors

Philipp Gunz

Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 6, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Simon Neubauer

Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 6, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Bruno Maureille

Université de Bordeaux, UMR5199 PACEA, équipe A3P, Avenue des Facultés, Université Bordeaux 1, 33405 Talence cedex, France.

By this author

Jean-Jacques Hublin

Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 6, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Top of page

Copyright

© Tous droits réservés

Top of page